Hiring again: WordPress/WooCommerce Developer

Van Patten Media Inc., a leading developer of custom WordPress websites, plugins, and web applications, is hiring a freelance WordPress & WooCommerce developer to help build amazing eCommerce experiences and integrations for our clients.

Requirements

  • Must own a recent Mac or *NIX machine
  • Advanced familiarity with WordPress and WooCommerce
  • Solid English (native-level is not required)
  • Comfort with the command line
  • Intermediate Git experience (committing/pushing, branching and merging, etc.)
  • Familiarity with Asana and Google Docs
  • 10+ available hours per week
  • Rock-solid understanding of modern PHP fundamentals, including object-oriented programming, dependency management and injection, data sanitisation and validation, etc.

Additionally, the following would be “nice to have”:

  • Familiarity with automated testing (TDD and BDD)
  • Comfortable using modern front-end tooling
  • Experience developing WordPress plugins
  • Regularly contribute to WordPress and/or WooCommerce core, or other open source projects

You will primarily work on WooCommerce-based projects, but there may be other WordPress projects depending on your interest level and availability.

Van Patten Media Inc. is an entirely remote team based in countries around the world.

Applications

Please contact us via email (work@vanpattenmedia.com) with a description of your qualifications, a link to a GitHub profile (or other open source code), and your hourly rate.

We’re hiring a WordPress QA Hero

Van Patten Media Inc., a leading developer of custom WordPress websites, plugins, and web applications, is hiring a freelance WordPress QA (Quality Assurance) “Hero” to help maintain client websites on an ongoing basis.

Requirements

  • Must own a recent Mac or *NIX machine
  • Intermediate-to-advanced familiarity with WordPress
  • Solid English (native-level is not required)
  • Attention to detail
  • Comfort with the command line
  • Familiarity with Asana and Google Docs
  • 3–5 available hours per week

This job will not include any development, but code-savvy applicants are welcome.

Please contact us via email (work@vanpattenmedia.com) with a description of your qualifications and rate (hourly or weekly).

No Mo’ Notices – Suppressing notices, about pages, and other nags in popular WordPress plugins

Earlier this week, I wrote a rant post about WordPress plugins that make it difficult to suppress certain admin notices, about pages, and other nags (such as feature pointers).

After filing some pull requests, talking to a few developers, and poking around code on GitHub, I’ve been able to cobble together some solutions for a few popular plugins like WooCommerce and WordPress SEO.

Read more…

We Don’t Need Your Stinkin’ Admin Notices

Over the past few weeks I’ve seen a frustrating trend. Increasingly, WordPress plugins have decided they see fit to add admin notices (those “flash message”-style nags at the top of your dashboard) and about pages (like the ones you see after upgrading WordPress itself)… without making them skippable via code.

You might be asking “why’s that a problem?” And sure, it seems innocuous enough.

The problem is that these messages often make assumptions about user behaviour that just aren’t always true. In the process, they frustrate, confuse, and ultimately hurt user experiences.

Read more…

5 Tips for Better Open Source Communities

At Van Patten Media, we release a lot of open source code. As a consequence, we receive a lot of suggestions and feedback, along with “pull requests” — submissions of code from other developers.

There are a lot of blog posts devoted to being better contributors to open source, but very few on being better leaders of open source projects (or, at least, better code reviewers).

Recently I’ve encountered several situations where people running open source projects haven’t handled pull requests in a way I thought was appropriate. Of course, to a degree this is all subjective, but I still think it’s worth sharing a few of the tips I use to make our open source projects more welcoming and leave developers happy.

Read more…